Thursday, April 27, 2017

Final Project ArcGIS, Bobwhite-Manatee Project

http://students.uwf.edu/hmf15/Intro2GIS/GISFinalProject.pptx

http://students.uwf.edu/hmf15/Intro2GIS/Presentation_Transcript.pdf
 
The first link listed above is the link to my final project presentation PowerPoint. The second link listed above is my presentation transcript with slide by slide commentary. The initial problem that started my project, was a power company wanting to find an acceptable route for a transmission line that would cross through Manatee and Sarasota county. After evaluating over 1,700 possibly routes they narrowed it down to one that they felt would cause the least amount of damage and disturbance to the community. The goal of my project was to analyze the final transmission line path and really access how the community would be affected. In order to do so, I focused on four main goals. Goal one was to quantify the amount of environmentally sensitive lands that would be affected. Goal two was to find out the number of homes that would be impacted. Goal three was to find out if there were any schools or day care facilities that would be impacted. Goal four was to find out the length of the proposed line in order to give decision makers a better idea of how much materials would be needed, and what it would cost. In order to find out the results of my four focal points and how I accomplished them, please use the two links listed above.

Cheers,
Hannah Findley

Friday, April 7, 2017

Week 13 ArcGIS Geo-referencing


This week in GIS we learned how to put hyperlinks into our map. First we made our own HTML link using the schools I: drive and our student sign in. After we created the link we used the editor tool bar to make changes to our layers. The map on the left we used the eagle's nest layer to edit and add the internet link to our eagles nest picture. What that did was make it so when you click on the eagle nest icon, the picture of the actual eagles nest pops up. We also used the digitizer to line up the aerial images and the UWF buildings layer on the map to the left. The map on the right we used Arcscene to make a 3-D layer of the same map of the UWF campus buildings, road, and aerial images that were digitized. All of the tools we learned how to use this week could be very useful. My favorite part was creating the 3-D map!

Cheers,
Hannah Findley

Monday, April 3, 2017

Week 12 ArcGIS Geocoding and Modelbuilding

This week we learned how to geocode addresses and use the modelbuilder in ArcMap. Geocoding the addresses was challenging and time consuming but will be valuable in future mapping. Geocoding allows you to take addresses from an excel sheet and create a layer on the map that makes then points. You can then use those geocoded address points to figure out the best route between selected addresses, as I did in the map above. I chose three addresses at random and used ArcMap to calculate the most optimal route between the three addresses.
The model builder function allowed us to create new very precise layers from multiple data sets.Then it creates new layers for the specifications you chose. For examples it we choose to create a layer that showed schools within 300 feet of possible gas leak areas. So after the model builder was finished it created a new layer for those schools and another layer that showed gas leak areas.
Although I struggled with this lab I definitely feel that it will be useful information to know.

Cheers,
Hannah

Monday, March 27, 2017

Week 10 ArcGIS Spatial Analysis

This week we learned how to use modeling tools that allowed us to buffer or overlay data. In order to run the buffer tool we created a script using ArcPython. I learned for future reference that if multiple functions need to be ran that arcpy will save a ton of time because you can run them all at once. We also analyzed our vector data by utilizing different spatial queries and tried different overlay operations to see which would work best for our data set and what we were trying to represent. The most valuable part of this lab for me was learning how to use arcpy and learning about all of the overlay operations that are possible. As I said previously arcpy is useful because it could potentially save a lot of time in future labs. The overlay operations were valuable because you can customize a new layer that only shows the exact data you need from two different data sets. For example, the map shown above shows possible camp sites, and the stipulation for the camp sites was that it had to be within 300 meters of a road, either within 150 meters of a lake or 500 meters of a river, and not in a conservation area. In order to do that I created a layer that only showed areas that were within the perimeters listed above, then used the "erase" overlay operation in order to delete areas within that, that were conservation areas. It is very time consuming to create these simple maps, but very useful from a practical standpoint.

Cheers,
Hannah Findley

Monday, March 6, 2017

Week 7/8 ArcGIS Searching for Data




This week our maps focused on Searching for data on our own and using that data to make maps of our choosing. I chose to make three separate maps since the county I was assigned had a lot of data to go with it.
The first map (Top, left) shows the elevations of Broward County, Florida and where the parks and recreational areas are located. I found the elevation data on the USGS (United States Geological Survey) website, and all the rest of the data I got from the FGDL (Florida Geographic Data Library) website.
The second map (Middle, left) shows the conservation areas and public land use near the major cities in Broward County, Florida. I found the conservation data on the FGDL website but they got the data from FNAI (Florida Natural Areas Inventory). All of the other data came from FGDL.
The third map (Last, left) shows where invasive species are located within conservation areas of Broward County, Florida. Again, the conservation data is from FNAI. The Aerial photos are from LABINS (Land Boundary Information system), the rest of the data was found through FGDL.
This lab was a reminder to save often when using ArcGIS, due to some loss of progress because of the program closing. This lab also made me realize how hard the data search part of map making really is. It took hours to find all of the data that I used to make these, and some trial and error. When looking for data make sure that you read the description and understand what type of data you are downloading, BEFORE you download it. For example, If you want the boundaries for all of the cities within a county make sure that you are getting polygon data and not point data. This lab also made me realize how much talent it takes to make a map that is visually pleasing and displays all that data it needs to. It was very hard for me to show all the data that I needed to without the map looking crowded and hard to read. I have a new respect for map makers.

Cheers,
Hannah Findley

Friday, February 24, 2017

Week 6 ArcGIS Projections Part 2


This week we got a lot of practice with downloading our data off the internet and using it to make maps in ArcMap. As you can see, the map I made shows the petroleum storage tanks in two areas of interest within Escambia County, Florida. In order to show this information I had to download data for Florida county boundaries and major roads off of the FGDL website. I got the aerial images and Quarter-quad data from LABINS website. In order for all of the data to line up correctly once it was added to ArcMap, I had to make sure they were all using the some coordinate projection. For this map I made all of the data match the projection that the aerial photos were in, which was State Plane projection. In order to do that, some of the data had to be re-projected. We also learned how to take coordinates and use them in ArcMap via an excel worksheet. By organizing the coordinates and applying a few calculations to them, I was able to make it so that ArcMap could use the data. This weeks map was a challenge to make, but I learned a lot about downloading, organizing, and utilizing data that is required to make maps.Once I'm out of this class I won't have anyone to provide the data I need to make a map, so these skills will be vital. Out of all the labs we have done so far, this one I feel is the most important for future map making.

Cheers,
Hannah Findley

Friday, February 10, 2017

Week 5 ArcGIS Projections

This week in GIS lab we learned about the importance of Projected Coordinate Systems and why all data being used for a map should be using the same system. Each system is going to show the shape of boundaries different, whether its a state or just a county. If you are using data that is set up for different coordinate systems, all of your data will not line up and the map will end up being very unreliable and not accurate. The map above shows three maps of Florida that show all of the county lines, and each map is shown in a different coordinate system. I put all three maps in different coordinate systems but color coded them all to be exactly the same for easy comparison. From what I found the UTM coordinate system is used mainly for navigation(sea, air, wind direction, and ocean currents). Most government organizations are said to use State Plane Coordinate System, and Albers Conical is typically used for small regions. All of the information about coordinate systems and projections will be very useful down the road when trying to decide which coordinate system to have all my data in to ensure the most accurate map possible.

Cheers,
Hannah Findley